Adolf Hitler a war hero? Anything but, said first world war comrades | World news | The Guardian

Adolf Hitler’s intolerance and antisemitism are traditionally explained in terms of his first world war experiences, but new research challenges such notions. Photograph: Getty Images
Adolf Hitler’s rabid antisemitism and virulent nationalism were not directly prompted by his experiences on the western front in the first world war, historical research suggests.

Unpublished letters and a diary written by veterans of Hitler’s wartime regiment are among newly unearthed documents that challenge previous notions about how the conflict shaped the future dictator’s views.

The documents overturn Hitler’s subsequent portrayal of his unit, the List regiment, as united in its intolerance and antisemitism, with Hitler “a hero at its heart”. They challenge long-held views on Hitler’s supposedly brave war record, revealing that frontline soldiers shunned him as a “rear area pig” based several miles from danger. The papers also disclose that List men saw Hitler as an object of ridicule, joking about him starving in a canned food factory, unable to open a tin with a bayonet. He was viewed by his comrades in regimental HQ as a loner, neither popular nor unpopular.

They noticed that he did not indulge in their favourite pastimes ā€“ letter-writing or drinking ā€“ but was instead often seen reading a political book or painting, earning him the sobriquet the “painter” or the “artist”. He was also viewed as particularly submissive to his superiors.

Perhaps no other individual has been more scrutinised than Hitler, but research on the List regiment by Dr Thomas Weber, lecturer in modern history at Aberdeen University, has unearthed new evidence.

About dmacc502

Happy individual with positive outlook. Enjoy people and sharing ideas and mindful thoughts. Avid news watcher, cat lover, birdwatcher and cook.Fortunate not to have to work and love my quiet time. Married with two daughters in college.
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